Mama, I’m Coming Home

“I have found out there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.” – Mark Twain

There is no way to adequately communicate how proud you would be of these students and the way they have pushed themselves through very early mornings like today. The bags were packed, meals eaten, and buses departed by 7am. There was noticeable excitement on the bus to get home and see parents, pets, and even a few siblings.

The teachers, administrators, and chaperones made a collective decision that arriving at 11:30pm was not going to cut it so the trip blogger got promoted to travel Nazi, and we came up with a plan to shed some travel time. Phase one of the plan was to create a competition between the boys and girls to see who could finish their Cracker Barrel lunch first. The lunch orders were out of the children’s mouths before the waitresses had finished the welcome, people were paying and using the bathrooms while the food was still being prepared, and the boys were running back on the bus in 54 minutes and 48 seconds. George Washington would have been proud. The girls made a valiant effort, but finished up about 13 minutes later. We are now 35 minutes ahead of schedule.

Phase two: our scheduled ‘recess’ stop was turned into a quick restroom break and just enough running around to allow the girls to catch up. We are now 50 minutes ahead of schedule and there is not a more important number on the bus than our GPS ETA.

Our bus drivers are fully behind our cause at this point pushing the buses to the limit of their governors and quickly making course corrections around accidents utilizing country roads as necessary. This is probably a good time to talk about the legend that is Terry. Terry is the boys’ bus driver who has won the hearts of everyone on the trip. Terry, a very large former football player and corrections officer who seamlessly blends teddy bear and Incredible Hulk, loved these kids, giving each student a high five every time they loaded and unloaded from the bus. Only Ms. Sherrick was able to squelch chants like “Terry! Terry! Terry!,” “Terry 2020!,” “What’s your favorite food? Terry-aki!” or, my personal favorite, “What’s the best dinosaur? A Terry-dactyl!” It is truly astounding how much you can do with the name Terry.

Somewhere in the deceivingly large state of South Carolina, the students and chaperones all participated in the 15th annual Geneva’s Got Talent, brought to us by ‘Terry-ble Productions.’ We saw magic tricks, comedy routines (thank you Pax), skits, juggling, commercials, music and a grand finale by the Renfrow, Dietel,  and Davis trio singing “Sweet Williamsburg.”

The girls took advantage of their newer and faster (and better smelling) bus and pulled ahead, but that was time easily made up at the next Cracker Barrel…or so we thought. We made record time at dinner thanks in no small part to the chaperones who ordered a to-go box to arrive with their meal, but just as they were getting their first bites in the parking lot, we realized we had no bus drivers. The drivers for the last leg were an hour and a half late and all our progress is wiped away. This must be how Cornwallis felt at Yorktown.

Again, I just can’t say enough about the resilience of both the kids and chaperones as we watch the ETA creep back up toward 11pm. Somewhere around north Georgia the bus bathrooms were opened, cruise controls set, and these busses were not stopping until we see The Geneva School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In all, this was a tremendous trip where we learned the history of our country, deepened our friendships, and grew in our gratitude to God. The students are already looking ahead to the 6th grade trip to Washington DC, that is, if Jesus Terrys.

by Jim Davis, parent blogger

Independence And Providence 

But by the all-powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me. – George Washington

Washington was never born to be killed by a bullet! I had seventeen fair fires at him with my rifle and after all could not bring him to the ground – A Native American fighting Washington in the French and Indian War

Our last day in Williamsburg started off a bit slower and (sigh) baconless. I guess the hotel learned their lesson. We bussed over to Yorktown where we learned the French really can fight! They still had a sour taste in their mouths after losing most of their New World claims in the French and Indian War, so they supported the cause of American independence and, in so doing, insured that they would not be speaking German in the 21st century. The French may have waited until momentum was on the side of the colonialists to commit soldiers, but for most of the war they supplied the Continental Army with everything from munitions to uniforms.

Yorktown was the battle that truly secured our freedom and put an end to the war, so we were thrilled to be able to tour this site with the insight of a Park Ranger who held every student’s attention. She told us how Washington made the British think he was going to attack New York and then, in the heat of summer, marched his men 450 miles south in less than six weeks to surprise General Cornwallis who was now blocked by Washington on land and the French navy by sea. It was clear to the students that to lead an army, you not only have to be brave, wise and hardworking, but excel in math, science and history as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After touring the battle site, we went to the Yorktown Victory Center to see what life on and off the battle field would have looked like. Life as a family in the colonies will shame the hardest working among us. Only the coldest parts of the year, when everyone is snowed into a one or two room house for weeks on end, would there be any rest. We watched as historians dressing the parts walked us through planting farms, making dinner, patching clothes and more. Some of our boys took a special interest in hauling water to do laundry so don’t be afraid to show them the washing machine when they come home.

When war broke out, though, families had some hard decisions to make. Does the husband go fight? If so, for which side? Do the wife and children remain at home or join the husband at camp? Park historians showed us what the life of a soldier would have demanded. The camp was cramped and smelly, the food was meager and more soldiers died from disease than gunshots. The students were shown their tight quarters (6 to a small tent), where food was prepared, how the injured were tended to, how troop movements were organized and even how secret codes were sent between troops.

 

 

 

 

 

 

One soldier demonstrated how a real musket fires and the origin of the phrase ‘half-cocked.’ We learned that rifles had been in use for some time by the outbreak of the war, but muskets were chosen for our armies because, despite being much less accurate, they could reload in a fraction of the time and send out three times as much lead. The kids had fun trying to shoulder this musket, but proved the British would have been in no danger:)

We talked about how hard it is to imagine a war in our own backyard raging twice as long as American involvement in WWII, the cost paid on all sides of the Atlantic or Americans, French, Native Americans and Africans all storming Yorktown armed side by side. But even more astounding are all the very little things God alone can control that came together to insure an American victory. The storm that protected Washington in Boston. The fog that protected Washington’s retreat in Long Island. The storm that prevented General Cornwallis from retreating at Yorktown. The bullets that simply could not hit Washington. As you retrace the steps of the American Revolution, you can’t kick the feeling that God wanted this country to form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The kids spent the end of the day back in Colonial Williamsburg seeing some more of the old town, getting muddy in the brick making building and spending whatever money they had left on trinkets they won’t care anything about in a week. But, we did create great memories!

by Jim Davis, parent blogger

Patriots and Patrons

If this be treason, make the most of it – Patrick Henry making his case for independence in Colonial Williamsburg

We traveled forward about 150 years from the Jamestown settlement today to tour Colonial Williamsburg, the capitol of Virginia from 1676-1780, named after King William. Thanks to money from John D. Rockefeller, the entire colonial center from this era has been perfectly restored and staffed. The students, dawned with breeches and doublets, were able to visit the blacksmith, printers, silversmith, gaol (jail), the House of Burgesses, the old governors palace, and many other 18th century businesses. We got a glimpse of what trial without representation looked like and we were, once again, thankful for 21st century America.

Our tour guide taught us all the manners expected of the day including how to bow, curtsy and where to the find the ‘necessary’ when necessary. We visited a wig store for those willing to spend a month’s salary on dark hair for the day and another month’s salary on gray hair for the evening. The students were proud to have learned that George Washington resisted the style of the day and wore his own hair. That’s the kind of first president that you want!

The staff in this town are much more than actors. They are historians who can knowledgeably answer any questions the students have. When explaining that we are from Florida, one colonialist responded, “I don’t think I’ve ever heard of Florida.” We all had fun dressing up in the garb of the time, but one of our parent chaperones, Warren Dietel, gets the best colonial dress award. He was actually stopped multiple times by inquisitive tourists who thought he was part of the show.

We were able to attend a noon day prayer service at the 300 year old Burton Parish Church. The names of the dignitaries who frequented the old church were written on the pews and in the center was a large, throne like chair reserved for the sitting governor of Virginia. You can imagine the self-control the students had to muster up to leave that chair alone! Speaking of self-control, we are so proud of these students. Almost everywhere we go we are complimented on how well-mannered, inquisitive and engaged they are.

If you ask your kids what their favorite part of colonial Williamsburg is, you will likely hear, “Anything with A/C!” Yes, it was hot, but that is all part of the experience 🙂  The boys shed all they could, but the women, well, not so lucky. Fortunately, it did cool down around dinner and then…off to the dance.

The students went to a colonial ball in the Capitol Building and it began just as awkwardly as you would imagine. They were paired up and taught three English dances and one French dance. The students did beautifully, though, and gave you the impression they might even enjoy it.

by Jim Davis, patent blogger

Road School

Are we there yet? Why don’t they turn on those TVs? How are we still in South Carolina? Can we watch the NBA playoffs where we are going? Is there Wifi on this bus? Did someone use the bus toilet? Was I supposed to bring a toothbrush?

In just about the time it would have taken us to fly to Tokyo, our bus caravan made it through five states to Williamsburg, VA. We battled device withdrawal, car sickness and Avengers: End Game spoilers, but we are here. A huge thanks to our teachers and administrator, Leslie Sherrick, Sarah Davenport and Keira Raesly, for all they did to get us here!

 

Our day started early at TGS. We divided into our chaperone groups, usually consisting of four students to one chaperone, and loaded up before sunrise. The first stretch was quiet as most students went back to sleep, but everyone was wide awake for our first break at the Georgia Welcome Center where we stretched our legs and took a group photo. Someone really needs to call their state congressman and tell them Floridians want to be welcomed with coffee!

This trip is all about cultural learning so we ate lunch at Savannah’s finest Cracker Barrel where the walls are littered with old items like radios, telephones, typewriters and stop lights. We quickly felt old when we realized that many of the children had no idea what those items were! Each child is given cash for the day and taught to budget two meals and factor in tax and tips. We soon saw who the spenders and savers were! The chaperones put their dialectic skills to the test as they worked to convince the children that 15 cents is not an appropriate tip for an $8 meal.

South Carolina seemed like it would never end, and road construction didn’t help any, but the kids were great occupying themselves with card games, books, and stories. We stopped at a rest area and brought out the frisbees, footballs, and soccer balls to work out some energy inside a well established parental perimeter. Then, back in the bus for some more South Carolina. I don’t think the Pacific Ocean made Louis and Clark happier than the North Carolina state line made these buses.

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, so we ate at another Cracker Barrel in North Carolina and we all observed how the accents have noticeably changed. Many of the boys ate quickly so they could maximize their checkers time before getting back on the road. The staff of both Cracker Barrels commented on what a well behaved and well mannered group we have. We were proud leaders, but you should be even more proud parents.

Once on the bus, the children worked on a devotional and then….finally…. got to watch a movie as we left North Carolina for the basketball country of Virginia:) We arrived at our hotel and managed to get most of the teeth brushed before bed.

As we ‘road school’ this week, our hope is that we would be travelers instead of mere tourists. Maybe even time travelers. Would you please join us in praying that we wouldn’t just learn history, but meet it.

by Jim Davis, parent blogger

Living Life like a Colonial

Today, in many ways, was the highpoint of our week. Today was the day when we got all dressed up in our colonial costumes and explored Williamsburg as if we were colonial residents back in the 18th century.

Throughout the course of the day, we got to imagine what our lives would be like in a myriad of different situations. We heard snippets of speeches from the House of Burgesses session in which the colonists voted for independence. We put ourselves in the shoes of a woman on trial for murder (or was it self defense?), and wondered what it would have been like to not be able to afford representation, and to have a jury that was more swayed by their physical discomfort in a room without heat or bathroom facilities than by the weight of the evidence.

We crowded into the old gaol (jail) cell and imagined what it might be like to have to spend time there – particularly if Black Beard the Pirate’s gang was sharing the space with us. In a radical shift of social cultures, we then walked through the Governor’s Palace and imagined our lives if we had been in the upper 5% of income levels in colonial Williamsburg. It should come as no surprise that the students would happily choose life in the ornate Governor’s Palace over the old gaol cell.

Our tour guide remarked that she had rarely seen a group of students so intent on what was being said, so eager to ask good questions, and so invested in the experience.

For most of the folks in colonial Williamsburg, life was neither in the jail or in the Governor’s Palace, but lived in very everyday ways as they plied their trade in a variety of occupations. We contemplated what life would be like if we were apprenticed in an apothecary shop, or as a silversmith. Many of the students were struck by the limited opportunities available to women in colonial times, and how different their lives would have been as a result. We met doctors, Cherokee Indians, saw Colonel Washington, watched cloth being woven, shoes being repaired, and dresses being made. Some of us sampled colonial libations (of coffee, tea, and chocolate) and in so doing met, Ann, a slave. Over half of the population in Williamsburg at the time would have been enslaved persons. It was an interesting opportunity for the students to reflect on the value of human beings as image bearers of God.

But colonial life was not all about work, and neither was our day. We enjoyed a rousing relay of hoop races, and just running in the green space. It was so fun to see the students enjoying the opportunity to play together.

As it was our regular chapel day, we had the opportunity to participate in the noonday prayer service at Bruton Parish Church. The students were delighted to read the names on the pew boxes of dozens of famous colonial families, and to imagine attending a service when dignitaries such as George Washington might have been present.

We had dinner in a colonial tavern and even enjoyed some live music. We ended our evening with a ball in the capitol building. Yes, your child danced! Sadly, no photos were permitted, though some of the students might be grateful for that. But I can assure you that there were smiles a plenty as they learned the steps and found they could do more than they thought.

It was a full day, a bit of an overwhelming day. We prayed for dry weather after yesterday’s drenching, and God was very gracious to us in providing an almost entirely dry day. We were fully immersed in the life of a colonial and the students were filled with wonder and questions and amazement.

In our devotions for the day, we reflected on how the colonists placed great value on excellence, order, and beauty. The students remarked on the extreme care and pride with which the tradespeople worked. The end of the day was a fabulous opportunity to reflect on 1 Corinthians 10:31 “Therefore, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” The students were able to think about how they saw that verse at work today, and how they see it at work in their own lives. Our students are not just on an entertaining trip, though they are having a great deal of fun. It’s not just an educational trip, though they are learning an immense amount. They are thinking about the bigger issues of life as they reflect on life in the 18th century as compared to life in the 21st century. May those thoughts continue to shape their lives far beyond this trip.

by Michelle Keller, parent blogger

The Rain Could Not Dampen Our Spirits

Dr. Clark graciously supplied the title for today’s Williamsburg blog post. It was indeed a rainy day – all day long, a steady, soaking rain. The locals in Jamestown said that it was the first rainy day they’d had in ages and they were grateful for it. Perspective is everything! Our students persevered in the midst of rain, and the gift shop was happy to sell a slew of brightly colored ponchos and keepsake Jamestown umbrellas.

We had an amazing set of guided tours and the students were happily engaged in answering and asking questions about the life of the first English settlers in Jamestown. They were able to look around at the area and discuss the benefits and drawbacks to founding a settlement in Jamestown. As we learned about the “starving time” when 4 out of 5 settlers died, the students were both sobered by the reality of what the people in Jamestown faced, and grateful for their own abundance. Later in our evening devotional time, one of the students reflected on that time and prayed for God’s grace to help her remember to be thankful for even the small things. What a joy to see the students connecting history and faith and gratitude!

Certainly one of the treats of the day (and not just because it was warm and dry) was a visit to the Jamestown Glass Blowers House. I won’t spoil the surprise for the families at home, but students did get to practice their math skills in the gift shop!

Our afternoon was spent immersing ourselves in the culture of the early 17th century settlement of Jamestown. We divided into two separate groups to enable more hands on time. The students were immediately caught up in learning what brought the English to Jamestown and how they interacted with the Powhatan indians who already lived here.

We learned about different weapons, tools, housing materials, and daily life of the Powhatan. The students even had a chance to try their hand at tanning a hide using only a shell for scraping.

From the English perspective, we saw how simple machines worked to load ships, how to navigate and record a ship’s journey. After going below deck of the Susan Constant (and exact replica of one of the ships carrying the original Jamestown settlers) and seeing how cramped and dark the space was, many a student (and chaperone) remembered our sixteen hour bus ride with a great deal of fondness. We had a chance to rest a bit inside the church building and reflect upon the importance of religion to the early settlers.

We finished up the day exploring the fabulous gallery of interactive exhibits exploring early colonial life and the intersection of three vastly different cultures – the Powhatan, the English, and the African slaves from Angola. As I looked around at the students enjoying a meal together after a long, cold, and wet day. I saw multiple different cultures all gathered together laughing, talking, and enjoying the full bounty of God’s goodness.

Our evening devotion closed with Psalm 18:10:

“The name of the LORD is a strong tower;

The righteous run to it and are safe.”

It was so encouraging to hear the students reflecting on all the ways in which they are “kept” and to talk to them about God’s goodness in His keeping. Placing that in the context of the intensively difficult circumstances faced by the settlers at Jamestown makes the promises of Scripture al the more sweet.

Next up…Williamsburg!

 

by parent blogger, Michelle Keller

We have arrived in Williamsburg

The hour was early, the sky was dark, but our spirits were high as we set off for our week long Williamsburg trip. The students were all excited to find out what groups they were in and get loaded on the bus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The prospect of sixteen hours on the bus was daunting, but the excitement carried the day. Some students slept, some talked, some read, some played games, many songs were sung and stories told.

Our first stop was at the Florida/Georgia border where we indulged in the first of many group photos. Then back on the bus until a lunch stop at Cracker Barrel. It was so fun to watch the groups work together on figuring out what to order, how much to tip, and how much money that would leave them for dinner (and souvenirs later).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had a good bit of rain throughout the afternoon, which meant that our afternoon break for “recess” was little more than a quick stretch of the legs on the walk to the restroom. But the students made up for it with some post dinner calisthenics – there were pushup challenges, plank competitions, and some arm wrestling.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After dinner, we were all excited to be in the final leg of our journey. The students did their first devotional in their chaperone groups and shared prayer requests. We know all our families at home are praying for us, and we are so thankful! After devotions, and some Scripture recitations, we treated the students with a showing of the movie “Up” which took us right up to our arrival at our hotel.

 

It was a long day, and everyone is tired. All in all, the long bus ride was such a fun opportunity to see our fifth graders learning to enjoy one another and find creative ways to entertain themselves and pass the time. I heard very few “are we there yet” questions, but did hear lots of laughter and good, encouraging conversation. What a delight!

Tomorrow we are off to Jamestown!

The Geneva School
The Geneva School
April 23, 2024
  • 6th Gr - DC Trip

    Date: April 22, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • Chamber Orchestra

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 7:15 am- 8:15 am
    See more details

  • US Praise and Prayer

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 7:30 am- 8:00 am
    See more details

  • Varsity Beach Volleyball District Semi Final & Final

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 9:00 am- 4:00 pm
    See more details

  • K4 Garden Club

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 1:20 pm- 2:20 pm
    See more details

  • Girls Varsity Tennis Regional vs. Cornerstone Charter

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 2:00 pm- 7:00 pm
    See more details

  • 1st & 2nd Grade Garden Club

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Philharmonia Orchestra

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

April 24, 2024
  • 6th Gr - DC Trip

    Date: April 22, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • Chamber Orchestra

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 7:15 am- 8:15 am
    See more details

  • House Meetings/No Chapel

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 9:25 am- 10:10 am
    See more details

  • Kindergarten Garden Club

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 2:15 pm- 3:15 pm
    See more details

  • Youth Track K4-Kindergarten 2:30-3:15; 1-5 3:15-4:15PM

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 2:30 pm- 4:15 pm
    See more details

  • Typing Class (4th-8th Grade)

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:20 pm- 4:20 pm
    See more details

  • 3rd & 4rt Grade Garden Club

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Brioso Choir

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • NHS Tutoring

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Stitch Lab (3rd–6th)

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Varsity Baseball Home Game vs Legacy

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 4:30 pm- 6:30 pm
    See more details

April 25, 2024
  • 6th Gr - DC Trip

    Date: April 22, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • 3rd Gr - Tea with Mr. Tumnus (Smith & Gilmartin)

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 1:30 pm- 2:05 pm
    See more details

  • 3rd Gr - Tea with Mr. Tumnus (Swain and Gutierrez)

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 2:15 pm- 2:50 pm
    See more details

  • Percussio

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:50 pm
    See more details

  • Softball Away Game - Beach Trip

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 4:30 pm- 6:30 pm
    See more details

April 26, 2024
  • 4th Gr - Knighting Ceremony

    Date: April 26, 2024 - April 26, 2024
    Time: 8:10 am- 3:00 pm
    See more details

  • Strategy & Board Games Club

    Date: April 26, 2024 - April 26, 2024
    Time: 3:20 pm- 5:20 pm
    See more details

  • Youth Tennis K-5th Grade with Stefanie Majstorovic

    Date: April 26, 2024 - April 26, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:45 pm
    See more details

April 27, 2024
  • Archery National Championships

    Date: April 27, 2024 - April 27, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • Daddy-Daughter Dance (K4-6th Grade)

    Date: April 27, 2024 - April 27, 2024
    Time: 6:30 pm- 8:30 pm
    See more details

April 23, 2024
  • 6th Gr - DC Trip

    Date: April 22, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • Chamber Orchestra

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 7:15 am- 8:15 am
    See more details

  • US Praise and Prayer

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 7:30 am- 8:00 am
    See more details

  • Varsity Beach Volleyball District Semi Final & Final

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 9:00 am- 4:00 pm
    See more details

  • K4 Garden Club

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 1:20 pm- 2:20 pm
    See more details

  • Girls Varsity Tennis Regional vs. Cornerstone Charter

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 2:00 pm- 7:00 pm
    See more details

  • 1st & 2nd Grade Garden Club

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Philharmonia Orchestra

    Date: April 23, 2024 - April 23, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

April 24, 2024
  • 6th Gr - DC Trip

    Date: April 22, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • Chamber Orchestra

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 7:15 am- 8:15 am
    See more details

  • House Meetings/No Chapel

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 9:25 am- 10:10 am
    See more details

  • Kindergarten Garden Club

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 2:15 pm- 3:15 pm
    See more details

  • Youth Track K4-Kindergarten 2:30-3:15; 1-5 3:15-4:15PM

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 2:30 pm- 4:15 pm
    See more details

  • Typing Class (4th-8th Grade)

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:20 pm- 4:20 pm
    See more details

  • 3rd & 4rt Grade Garden Club

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Brioso Choir

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • NHS Tutoring

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Stitch Lab (3rd–6th)

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:30 pm
    See more details

  • Varsity Baseball Home Game vs Legacy

    Date: April 24, 2024 - April 24, 2024
    Time: 4:30 pm- 6:30 pm
    See more details

April 25, 2024
  • 6th Gr - DC Trip

    Date: April 22, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • 3rd Gr - Tea with Mr. Tumnus (Smith & Gilmartin)

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 1:30 pm- 2:05 pm
    See more details

  • 3rd Gr - Tea with Mr. Tumnus (Swain and Gutierrez)

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 2:15 pm- 2:50 pm
    See more details

  • Percussio

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:50 pm
    See more details

  • Softball Away Game - Beach Trip

    Date: April 25, 2024 - April 25, 2024
    Time: 4:30 pm- 6:30 pm
    See more details

April 26, 2024
  • 4th Gr - Knighting Ceremony

    Date: April 26, 2024 - April 26, 2024
    Time: 8:10 am- 3:00 pm
    See more details

  • Strategy & Board Games Club

    Date: April 26, 2024 - April 26, 2024
    Time: 3:20 pm- 5:20 pm
    See more details

  • Youth Tennis K-5th Grade with Stefanie Majstorovic

    Date: April 26, 2024 - April 26, 2024
    Time: 3:30 pm- 4:45 pm
    See more details

April 27, 2024
  • Archery National Championships

    Date: April 27, 2024 - April 27, 2024
    Time: 12:00 am- 11:59 pm
    See more details

  • Daddy-Daughter Dance (K4-6th Grade)

    Date: April 27, 2024 - April 27, 2024
    Time: 6:30 pm- 8:30 pm
    See more details

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