Summer Reading

The love of reading good books is something we want to see in all our children. Apart from the sheer enjoyment gained from reading there are numerous other benefits. When children read more than just their classroom assignments, research clearly shows that they generally do well in school. Reading expands a student’s vocabulary and comprehension and leads to better writing skills. Children who read more serious literary works also gain skills in handling complex ideas. The more they read, the more information they pick up. This leads to a solid core of knowledge that is useful across the curriculum. Besides helping children do well in school, reading also helps them expand their horizons as they learn more about people and the world.

So, encourage your children to read. Read with them, and around them, and to them. Remember also, unabridged audio books are widely available in libraries and are great for long road trips, and Kindle Readers can now read books aloud to students as well.

Students entering grades 7–12 are required to read one (and maybe two or three) assigned books during the summer. An assignment will be given within the first few weeks of school based on the required reading. Additionally, other books deemed valuable by our teachers are recommended. They reflect some of the best of Geneva’s ideals of faith and of learning.

Note to Parents

We recommend that you participate in your child’s summer literature experience by reading, or at least previewing, the books that your child selects. Some of the texts within the list below contain difficult subject matter, strong language, and/or powerful scenes that may remain with the reader long after they have finished the book. Be assured that the faculty has taken the utmost care in choosing titles for this summer’s reading list, believing that their content is of value, is consistent with Geneva’s educational objectives, and will act as a spring board for discussion and deeper thought. However, while each of these texts has been read by our faculty and deemed appropriate for certain age groups, we encourage you to screen the chosen selections to help ensure appropriateness, keeping in mind your own personal family convictions and your child’s individual sensibilities.

K4 & KINDERGARTEN SUMMER READING 2019

“To introduce children to literature is to install them in a very rich and glorious kingdom, to bring a continual holiday to their doors, to lay before them a feast exquisitely served. But they must learn to know literature by being familiar with it from the very first. A child’s learning must always be with good books, the best that we can find” ~ Charlotte Mason

We hope that you will be spending this summer enjoying the outdoors with your children and also reading to them. Below is a list of possible books to put on your list!

A New Coat for Anna by Harriet Ziefert
Annie and the Wild Animals by Jan Brett
Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown
Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban
Carrot Seed by Robert Kraus
Dandelion by Don Freeman
Ferdinand by Munro Leaf
Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson
Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion
If you Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff
Jesse Bear What Will You Wear? Nancy White Carlstrom
Katie and the Sunflowers by James Mayhew
Katy No Pockets by Emmy Payne
Leo the Late Bloomer by Robert Kraus
Little Bear by Else Homelund Minarik
Little Fur Family by Margaret Wise Brown
Make Way for the Ducklings by Robert McCloskey
Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney
Moon: A Peek Through Picture Book by Britta Teckentrup
Nighty Night Cooper by Laura Numeroff
Norman the Doorman by Don Freeman
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss
Over and Under the Pond by Kate Messner
Owl Babies by Martin Waddell
Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown
Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy E Shaw
Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
Stone Soup by Marcia Brown
Swimmy by Leo Lionni
The Cock, The Mouse, and The Little Red Hen by Lorinda Bryan Cauley
The Little Engine that Could by Watty Piper
The Little Pokey Puppy by Janette Sebring Lowrey
The Story about Ping by Marjorie Flack
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Tops and Bottoms by Janet Stevens
Where Does the Butterfly Go When it Rains? By May Garelick
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne

FIRST GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Reading is a foundational skill for education. During a child’s first grade year at The Geneva School, he/she will be exposed to many genres of quality literature. Throughout the summer, leading up to this year, we recommend that parents spend time reading aloud to their child. We would like to offer the following recommendations to assist you in developing the love of reading in your child.

A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams
A New Coat for Anna by Harriet Ziefert
Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie (and others in the series) by Laura Joffe Numeroff
James Herriot’s Treasury for Children by James Herriot
Lily’s Little Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes
The Emperor’s New Clothes by Han Christian Andersen
The Little Engine that Could by Watty Piper
The Magic Fish by Freya Littledale
The Original Mother Goose by Blanche Fisher Wright (illustrator)
The Story of Ping by Marjorie Flack/Kurt Weise
Any books by Eric Carles, Jan Brett, and Leo Lionni
Corduroy series by Don Freeman
Curious George series by H.A. Rey
Henry and Mudge series by Cynthia Rylant
Little Bear series by Else Homelund Minarik
Mr. Putter and Tabby series by Cynthia Rylant

SECOND GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

We hope you encourage your children to immerse themselves in good books over the summer! We present this list to you as a guide, but please feel free to offer your children other books appropriate to their reading level. Children entering second grade are at different reading levels and you may find the books on the rising first grade list to be suitable for your children. The books marked with an asterisk (*) are of an easier reading level.

Birthday for Frances (or others in series) by Lillian Hoban *
Owl Moon by Jane Yolen *
Roxaboxen by Barabra Cooney *
The Biggest Bear by Lynd Kendall Ward *
Blaze and the Lost Quarry (or others in series) by C.W. Anderson *
A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams *
Doctor Desoto by William Steig *
The Emperor’s New Clothes by Hans Christian Andersen *
Thunder Cake by Patricia Polacco *
When We Were Very Young by A.A. Milne
Now We Are Six by A.A. Milne
Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Ugly Duckling by Hans Christian Andersen
Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
My Father’s Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannet
Will You Sign Here, John Hancock? by Jean Fritz
The Selfish Giant by Oscar Wilde
The Courage of Sarah Noble by Alice Dalgliesh
Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle by Betty MacDonald
Any Tomie dePaola Book *
George and Martha series by James Marshall *
Mouse on the Motorcycle series by Beverly Cleary
The Boxcar Children’s series by Gertrude Chandler Warner
The Cam Jansen Mystery series by David A. Adler
Mary Pope Osborne series
Usborne Time Traveler series

THIRD GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Please encourage your children to immerse themselves in good books over the summer. We present this list to you as a guide, but please feel free to offer your children other books appropriate to their reading level. We realize that children entering third grade are at different reading levels. For this reason some of the books on the rising second grade list might also be appropriate to offer your children. Those books marked here with an asterisk (*) are of an easier reading level.

Adventures of Laura and Jack by Laura Ingalls Wilder *
School Mouse; Charlie Muffin’s Miracle Mouse; Funny Frank all by Dick King-Smith *
Hannah; Silver; Indian School; Next Spring an Oriole all by Gloria Whelan *
Punished by David Lubar *
Friska, My Friend by Patricia St. John *
The Other Kitten by Patricia St. John *
Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl *
Shoeshine Girl by Clyde Robert Bulla *
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
Stuart Little by E.B. White
The Trumpet of the Swan by E.B. White
The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis
Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry
Sea Star – Orphan of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry
Homer Price by Robert McCloskey
The Moffats by Eleanor Estes
Ralph S. Mouse by Beverly Cleary
Henry Huggins by Beverly Cleary
Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
Mandie and the Secret Tunnel by Lois Gladys Leppard
The Wonder Clock by Howard Pyle
The King of the Golden River by John Ruskin
DK Eyewitness Books: Ancient Greece by Anne Pearson
DK Eyewitness Books: Ancient Rome by Simon James
Jigsaw Jones series by James Preller *
Katie Kazoo, Switcheroo series by Nancy Krulik *
Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder

FOURTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

The following titles are age appropriate books from a variety of genres that are considered to be excellent literature. These stories are recommended by our teachers to feed children’s imaginations, fuel their excitement in learning, and nourish their souls during summer vacation. The reading is not required but highly encouraged for young and old alike.

* Advanced Reading Level
+ Pertain to topics that will be studied in history during the upcoming year

Suggested Fiction and Historical Fiction

Beorn the Proud by Madeline Pollard +
The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis
Huguenot Garden by Douglas M. Jones III +
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert C. O’Brien
The Trumpet of the Swan by E. B. White
My Father’s Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett
All-of-a-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor
The Borrowers by Mary Norton
Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
Aladdin and Other Tales from the Arabian Nights by N. J. Dawood
The Complete Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault by Charles Perrault
Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
Crispin by Avi
Ramona and Her Father by Beverly Cleary
Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
The Beggar’s Bible (John Wycliffe) by Louise A. Vernon +
The Bible Smuggler (William Tyndale) by Louise A. Vernon +
The Man Who Laid the Egg (Erasmus) by Louise A. Vernon +
The Silver Branch by Rosemary Sutcliff *
Dawn Wind by Rosemary Sutcliff *
At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald *
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling *
Dear America / My America series

Suggested Biographies

Augustine the Farmers Boy of Tagaste by P. de Zeeuw +
Luther the Leader by Virgil Robinson +
The River of Grace (John Calvin) by Joyce McPherson +
Saint Patrick: Pioneer Missionary to Ireland by Michael J. McHugh
E. B. White: Some Writer! by Beverly Gherman
C. S. Lewis: the Man Who Created Narnia by Michael Coren
Who Was Marco Polo? by Joan Holub +
Along Came Galileo by Jeanne Bendick
A Piece of the Mountain (Pascal) by Joyce McPherson *
Alexander the Great by John Gunther *

FIFTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

The following titles are age appropriate books from a variety of genres that are considered to be excellent literature. These stories are recommended by our teachers to feed children’s imaginations, fuel their excitement in learning, and nourish their souls during summer vacation. The reading is not required but highly encouraged for young and old alike.

* Advanced reading level
+ Pertain to topics that will be studied in history during the upcoming year

Suggested Fiction and Historical Fiction

Summer of the Monkeys by Wilson Rawls
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin
Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright
One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George
A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Early Thunder by Jean Fritz
Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink
Guns for General Washington: A Story of the American Revolution by Seymour Reit +
Mr. Revere and I by Robert Lawson +
Ben and Me: An Astonishing Life of Benjamin Franklin by His Good Mouse Amos by Robert Lawson +
The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
City of Ember by Jeanne Duprau
Hoot by Carl Hiassen
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
The Children’s Homer: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Fall of Troy by Padraic Colum
Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss *
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame *
Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi *
At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald

Suggested Biographies

Ben Franklin of Old Philadelphia by Margaret Cousins +
The Great Little Madison by Jean Fritz
Pocahontas and the Strangers by Robert Clyde Bulla
John Paul Jones by Sperry Armstrong
Why Not, Lafayette? by Jean Fritz +
Traitor: the Case of Benedict Arnold by Jean Fritz +
Around the World in a Hundred Years by Jean Fritz +
Pocohantas by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire
Columbus by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire +
Leif the Lucky by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire
Benjamin Franklin by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire +
Daniel Boone: His Own Story by Daniel Boone +
Magellan: Ferdinand Magellan and the First Trip Around the World (Exploring the World) by Michael Burgan +
John Wesley: The World His Parish by Goeff and Jenet Benge +

SIXTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

The following titles are age appropriate books from a variety of genres that are considered to be excellent literature. These stories are recommended by our teachers to feed children’s imaginations, fuel their excitement in learning, and nourish their souls during summer vacation. The reading is not required but highly encouraged for young and old alike.

* Advanced reading level
+ Pertain to topics that will be studied in history during the upcoming year

Suggested Fiction and Historical Fiction

The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings *
The Cay by Theodore Taylor
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Boy in the Alamo by Margaret Cousins
Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor
Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
Sounder by William H. Armstrong
Hitty Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
The Fellowship of the Ring by J. R. R. Tolkien *
The Dragon King Trilogy (In the Hall of the Dragon King; The Warlords of Nin; The Sword and the Flame) by Stephen R. Lawhead *
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan
Wonder by R. J. Palacio
Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli
Kensuke’s Kingdom by Michael Morpurgo
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
Mary Poppins by P. L. Travers
Tintin Books by Hergé

Suggested Biographies

Abe Lincoln: Log Cabin to White House by Sterling North +
Basher Five-Two (US Pilot in Bosnia) by Captain Scott O’Grady
Bruchko (Missionary to S. American Indians) by Bruce Olson
Carry a Big Stick: The Uncommon Heroism of Theodore Roosevelt by George Grant *+
Children of the Storm (Christian family in the former Soviet Union) by Natasha Vins
The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank *+
If I Perish (Christian in Japan during WWII) by Esther Ahn Kim
Raoul Wallenberg: The Man Who Stopped Death by Sharon Linnea *
The Wright Brothers by Quentin Reynolds +
George Washington Carver: From Slave to Scientist by Geoff and Janet Benge +
Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman +
Stonewall by Jean Fritz +
Rosa Parks: My Story by Rosa Parks +
The Story of Thomas Alva Edison by Margaret Cousins

SEVENTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Required Book

The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox. This Newbery Award book is a fascinating tale of a young boy who finds himself caught up in the slave trade. This book reveals man’s cruelty to man, and as we discuss this book, it leads to the introduction of the theme of seventh grade literature, which is The Nature of Man, in particular the depravity of man, and the need for Christ as our Savior.

At least one of the following inspirational books should be read over the summer in addition to The Slave Dancer

These suggested titles are inspirational tales of missionaries and others led by God to overcome incredible obstacles.

Amy Carmichael: Let the Little Children Come by Lois Hoadley Dick. The tale of a missionary in India who rescued children from an awful “marriage to the gods.”

George Muller: Man of Faith and Miracles by Basil Miller. The story of a man who was a vagabond and thief brought to faith in Christ. He started an orphanage ministry and proved that despite poverty, God could provide for the thousands of orphans in his care.

The Little Woman by Gladys Aylward. The story of a woman who fulfilled her calling as a missionary during China’s turbulent Sino-Japanese war in the 1930′s. She had to overcome many obstacles to work in China; one of her many contributions was overseeing the safety of over 100 orphans. This is a wonderful testimony to the power of prayer.

Eric Liddell: Something Greater than Gold by Janet Benge and Geoff Benge OR Eric Liddell by Catherine Swift. Eric Liddell was the hero of the film “Chariots of Fire,” and risked becoming a national disgrace at the 1924 Paris Olympics when he refused to run on Sunday. This story of “God’s Athlete” makes inspiring reading.

EIGHTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Required Books

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis. In this, the fifth book in the Chronicles of Narnia series, the story follows King Caspian’s journey through the Eastern Seas to find the seven missing lords of Narnia and seek out Aslan’s country. Like the other Narnia chronicles, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader combines Christian symbolism with elements of fantasy stories, but this particular book also introduces motifs from great travel literature and adventure stories. When they read Homer’s Odyssey, students will recognize that Odysseus and his crew, like Caspian and his friends, embark on a sea voyage and encounter a variety of fantastic places and dangers that hinder their progress; unlike Odysseus, Caspian is not trying to get home, but to find the end of the world. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is rich in Christian symbolism and is a stepping stone for students to begin to delve into the principles of Christianity.

At least one of the following books should be read over the summer in addition to The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Mythology by Edith Hamilton. Reading the following stories will equip students with knowledge of the background stories of the Trojan War before beginning to read The Iliad in eighth grade literature class:

  • The heroes of the Trojan War, including the Judgment of Paris
  • The Trojan War
  • The House of Atreus

Peace Child by Don Richardson. This is an adventure bristling with cannibals, jungles, and heart-chilling events. It is a true story of missionaries sent to minister among cannibals in New Guinea who venerate treachery. How can the truth of the gospel penetrate such hardened hearts? Read how God provides Don Richardson with an incredible opportunity to speak to the souls of these savages, and how the “peace child” is used to bring salvation to a large number of people.

Joni: An Unforgettable Story by Joni Eareckson Tada and Billy Graham. The amazing story of how one young woman overcame her disability through courage and faith.

Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to end Slavery by Eric Metaxas. This story displays how one man fundamentally changed humanity’s attitude towards human suffering.

Through Gates of Splendor by Elisabeth Elliot OR Jim Elliot: One Great Purpose by Janet and Geoff Benge.

NINTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Required Books For English

Students will need their own copy of The Lord of the Rings to read, pore over, dig into, mark up, underline, and love. It is one story, one book, but most often divided for publication into three volumes: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King. Any edition of this oft-printed book will do, but it may be easiest and least expensive to find the paperback set: ISBN-10: 0345538374.

PLEASE NOTE: Students must own all three volumes of the book. Please buy them all at once to avoid mix-ups or delays trying to buy missing volumes later in the year.

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, , by JRR Tolkien.

Our journey into the great mythical and poetic literature of the West starts here. This first volume is the students’ summer reading; The Two Towers and The Return of the King will be read during the school year as part of the ninth grade English curriculum.

Be sure to read the Prologue that precedes Chapter 1. Whether you have read The Hobbit or not, this introduction will be helpful to set the stage for what’s to come—a good reminder of what hobbits are, what they are like, and how the One Ring around which the story centers was found.

Required Books For History

The Lantern Bearers (The Roman Britain Trilogy) by Rosemary Sutcliff. Set in Roman Britain during the fifth century, it is the story of a British Roman’s life after the final withdrawal of Roman troops (around 410 AD) and the invasion of the Saxons into southern Britain. The setting is the time of the “real” King Arthur and the wars between the native Romano-Celts and the Saxons. The Lantern Bearers is a compelling story inviting the reader into the world of the first Germanic migratory tribes and will set the scene for ninth grade history’s introduction into the world of the falling Roman Empire and the beginning of the early Middle Ages.

Be ready for a class discussion and a quiz when you get back to school.

The following is a list of recommended additional reading

On the Shoulders of Hobbits: The Road to Virtue with Tolkien and Lewis, by Louis Markos. This is a readable, inspiring introduction to the larger project of “re-mythologizing” Western literature that both Professor Tolkien and CS Lewis were engaged in. Markos invites us to be inspired by the characters of Narnia and Middle-earth to live lives of virtue.

Odd and the Frost Giants, by Neil Gaiman. A whimsical and well-written story set squarely in the cold, northern world of the Norse gods and giants, this short, illustrated tale will give students a taste of the chilly climes and fantastic adventures that await in medieval literature.

Crispin: The Cross of Lead, by Avi OR The Seeing Stone, by Kevin Crossley-Holland. Either of these two un-put-down-able (it’s okay—English teachers are allowed to make up words) will thrust readers right into the midst of everyday life in the Middle Ages.

TENTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Required Books

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1831 edition). The tale of the creation and subsequent “life” of a hideous monster, Shelley’s novel has literary, historical, and moral significance. Containing elements of the gothic novel, it is considered one of the earliest examples of science fiction. The book is also important because it reflects many of the themes of the Romantic age, a movement in the first half of the 19th century that was a reaction against the Enlightenment. More importantly, the novel examines the tendency of man to act beyond the natural order through scientific overreaching with devastating results. In this sense, Frankenstein provides rich discussion points on such theological ideas as the nature of man and human depravity.

NB: Mary Shelley wrote two editions of Frankenstein, one in 1818 and the other in 1831. Students should read the 1831 edition.  Here is a link to the 1831 edition (ISBN: 0451532244).

The following is a list of recommended additional reading

Silas Marner by George Eliot
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

ELEVENTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Required Reading for Non-Honors & Honors Students

Students are asked to read two short stories (links below) and as well as How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines, Revised Edition by Thomas C. Foster.

Two Short Stories:

How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines, Revised Edition by Thomas C. Foster. Foster’s book introduces many of the major themes and narrative devices that students will need to master over the course of the year. While students are welcomed to read the book in its entirety, the following chapters are required:

Introduction: How’d He Do That?
Chapter 1: Every Trip Is a Quest (Except When It’s Not)
Chapter 2: Nice to Eat with You: Acts of Communion
Chapter 4: Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before?
Chapter 5: When in Doubt, It’s from Shakespeare…
Chapter 6: … Or the Bible
Chapter 8: It’s Greek to Me
Chapter 9: It’s More Than Just Rain or Snow
Chapter 10: Never Stand Next to the Hero
Chapter 12: Is That a Symbol?
Chapter 14: Yes, She’s a Christ Figure, Too
Chapter 19: Geography Matters…
Chapter 20: … So Does Season
Chapter 21: Marked for Greatness
Chapter 24: Don’t Read with Your Eyes
Chapter 27: A Test Case

Foster Assignment: Students have questions to answer about this reading that are due the first day of school. Click here to download the Foster assignment.

Required Reading for AP Students

AP students should choose two of the following novels to read. Not all of these works are written by American authors, but all are frequently cited on the AP Literature exam. Please make sure your choice is approved by your parents as some works contain more sensitive material:

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

AP Assignment: Students should purchase a paperback copy of the novels they choose and annotate as they read. Mrs. Turnbull will collect annotations the first week of school. Annotations should be thorough to demonstrate interaction with the work, but they need not be overly extensive. For help on annotating a work, download this document.

TWELFTH GRADE SUMMER READING 2019

Required Books

Students will need their own copy of the following books to read, pore over, dig into, mark up, underline, and love. Any edition of these oft-reprinted books will do and can be readily found at Amazon or any new or used bookstore. Your teacher will expect to see signs of close reading and thoughtful reflection in the text and margins of the books come August!

Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold by C. S. Lewis. Lewis’ last novel is a recasting of the myth of Cupid and Psyche as a fascinating tale of love, loss, faith, and skepticism, a deep dive into the human soul. The culmination, in a way, of Lewis’ scholarly and literary careers, the novel yields much fruit when well enjoyed by a classically educated Christian reader. Taste and see!

Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes, by Edith Hamilton OR D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths, by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’AulaireThese classic collections of Greek and Roman myths are a great review of the stories, personalities, gods, and heroes that animate not only those ancient cultures but all of Western Civilization. They are an easy “read”—the D’Aulaires’ volume is even amusingly illustrated. Even if you have read the tales before, choose one of these books to reacquaint you with the tales.

All AP and honors students must also select and read at least one of the following:
Othello, by William Shakespeare
The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway
Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
That Hideous Strength, by CS Lewis
The Faerie Queene, Book I, ed. Carol V Kaske (ISBN-13: 978-0872208070)

There will be assignments given in the first quarter drawing on the reading of these books, so come prepared to discuss, analyze, compare, and further your insight into what you’ve read.

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The Geneva School
The Geneva School

Nothing from June 19, 2019 to June 24, 2019.

Nothing from June 19, 2019 to June 24, 2019.

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